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Evolving Considerations in the Individualization of Treatment in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC)
Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States. Colorectal cancer, when discovered early, is highly treatable however once the disease has spread, or metastasized, treatment and management become much more difficult. Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 70% for regional metastases and 13% for distant metastases. The prognosis of patients with mCRC has significantly improved in recent years with the introduction of individualized or target therapies such as inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways. Traditional regimens such as chemotherapy may also be used in combination with targeted therapies, further increasing efficacy and ultimately improving patient survival and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2018
 
Novel Therapies in the Management of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): New Strategies and Options
Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, responsible for approximately 90–95% of cases. Approximately 16% of patients with RCC will have metastases at diagnosis, and as many as 40% will demonstrate metastasis after primary surgical treatment for localized RCC. With a 5-year survival rate ranging from 5% to 12%, the prognosis for any treated renal cell cancer patient with progressing, recurring, or relapsing disease is poor, regardless of cell type or stage. Almost all patients with advanced renal cell cancer are incurable. Fortunately for patients with advanced RCC, several new treatments, including immunotherapies and targeted therapies, have recently become available giving clinicians new options to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. This activity will focus on these evolving options, how to integrate them into the treatment paradigm, options for patients who have received prior therapies, and how to apply evidence-based data to select appropriate treatment regimens and manage toxicities
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2018
 
New Frontiers in Metastatic Melanoma: A Closer Look at the Role of Immunotherapy
Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer and prognosis is usually good for patients, but when the melanoma recurs after initial surgery, prognosis is especially poor. Fortunately for patients with unresectable, recurrent melanoma, and the physicians that treat them, significant progress has been made in the treatment of this deadly disease over the past few years. In unresectable melanoma that is recurrent, the goal of treatment is to shrink or get rid of the melanoma and prevent the disease from spreading. Recently, new classes of immunotherapies have become available for patients with unresectable melanoma. These therapies help the immune system sustain an active response in its attack on melanoma cells.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2018
 
Novel Treatment Advances and Approaches in the Management of Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma
Multiple myeloma is a systemic malignancy of plasma cells that is highly treatable but rarely curable and the stage of the disease at presentation is a strong determinant of survival. Treatment selection is influenced by patient age and general health, prior therapy, and the presence of complications of the disease. Treatment is directed at reducing the tumor cell burden and reversing any complications of disease, such as renal failure, infection, hyperviscosity, or hypercalcemia with appropriate medical management. Unfortunately, multiple myeloma remains a disease with poor long-term survival as it is currently incurable and all patients will eventually relapse, underlining the need for new therapies. Thankfully several drugs have recently been approved, including combination therapies, for relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. These options have shown great promise in their ability to improve clinical outcomes and include the next-generation proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib, and next-generation immunomodulatory agent pomalidomide.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2018
 
Managing Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Understanding the Therapeutic Landscape
Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, which is typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. The treatment of CRPC has dramatically changed over the past decade and despite recent advances, the prognosis for patients still need improvement, with a significant impact on patients’ quality of life, resulting predominantly from skeletal metastases. Patients with all stages of CRPC have many treatment options available starting with frontline to second-line therapy and to immunotherapy and chemotherapy. For many years, cytotoxic chemotherapy with docetaxel was the common form of treatment for in patients with symptomatic or rapidly progressing disease, but recent emerging therapies are demonstrating improved survival with a variety of advanced therapeutic agents. Recently updated guidelines on optimal sequencing and switching of antiandrogens, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, biomarkers and appropriate patient selection criteria in patients with CRPC have been produced and are being used to better treat the disease.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2018
 
Understanding Appropriate Treatments to Prevent and Manage Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV)
Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the most feared side effects of cancer chemotherapy treatments. Risk factors for this condition fall into patient-specific and therapy-specific categories. Factors such as gender, age, anxiety, and alcohol use effect the probability that patients will experience CINV. In addition, treatment schedule, chemotherapy dosage, and drug combination can also put a patient at risk for CINV. As many as 80% of cancer patients suffer from this predictable and preventable condition, and as a result, up to 50% of these patients may delay or even refuse potentially life-saving chemotherapy treatments. Because antiemetic medication has such a high success rate, chemotherapy patients no longer have to accept nausea, vomiting, and a decreased quality of life as an automatic consequence of treating cancer. With the addition of these drugs (either orally or intravenously) to chemotherapy, research shows that CINV has been prevented in as many as 80% of patients who normally experience nausea and vomiting after treatment.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2018
 

Updates in the Management of Stage IV NSCLC
Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women and accounts for approximately 80% of all cancer cases. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. The concept of tailoring therapies based on clinical and molecular markers has transformed the management of advanced NSCLC, but also complicated the treatment paradigm, as there are many possible options for each individual patient. Additionally, more agents have recently been approved, with some undergoing regulatory review, for advanced anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) NSCLC, which have shown the ability to help increase prognosis, survival and quality of life in NSCLC. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) need to be aware of information regarding tumor-specific diagnosis, expanding treatment options, and supporting data to maximize the care of their patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2018
 

Management of Hormone Receptor Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer
Death rates in breast cancer have been steadily decreasing over the past 20 years due to new and ever improving treatment options. However, once the disease progresses and distant metastases are present, a cure becomes less likely and few patients are rendered free of disease. Therapy in the advanced, metastatic setting then focuses on prolonging life and managing disease-and treatment-related adverse events. There is no single treatment strategy that will work for all patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Instead, treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. With the advancement and complexity of different treatment options, clinicians are being challenged to quickly diagnose breast cancer and its corresponding stage, and provide the best evidenced-based treatment that is available for patients. Breast cancers that are hormone receptor (HR) positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative are the most common subtype of breast cancer. As the treatment landscape changes and new options become available to clinicians, it is becoming more difficult for healthcare professionals to stay up to date on the different options and strategies for patients with advanced breast cancer. In the last few years, new treatment options have been approved for patients with HR+ advanced breast cancer, especially in therapy beyond the first or second line setting.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to August 1, 2018
 
Integrating Novel Personalized Therapy into the Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Paradigm
Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women and more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. Recent clinical data have demonstrated that NSCLC is a very heterogeneous disease. However, as more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Additionally, more agents that have been recently approved could help increase prognosis and quality of life in NSCLC patients. Guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) have recently been updated to incorporate a section on maintenance therapy in the management of advanced NSCLC. Maintenance therapy refers to treatment that prevents a cancer from spreading after it has responded to initial treatments and has been shown to extend the lives of advanced NSCLC patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 31, 2018
 
Integrating Emerging Therapies into the Treatment Paradigm in the Management of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC)
The prognosis for any treated renal cell cancer patient with progressing, recurring, or relapsing disease is poor, regardless of cell type or stage. Almost all patients with advanced renal cell cancer are incurable. The question and selection of further treatment depends on many factors, including previous treatment and site of recurrence, as well as individual patient considerations. Fortunately, clinicians have recently been equipped with more options to integrate into the advanced RCC treatment paradigm, including targeted therapies, which individualize therapy for patients with advanced RCC who have progressed on prior therapies, ultimately improving patient outcomes and quality of life. These new options have shown improved efficacy and safety in advanced RCC.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 31, 2018
 
Immunotherapy and Cancer
Cancer immunotherapy is the use of the immune system to treat cancer. Immunotherapies can be categorized as active, passive or hybrid (active and passive). These approaches exploit the fact that cancer cells often have molecules on their surface that can be detected by the immune system, known as tumourassociated antigens (TAAs); they are often proteins or other macromolecules (e.g. carbohydrates). Active immunotherapy directs the immune system to attack tumor cells by targeting TAAs. Passive immunotherapies enhance existing anti-tumor responses and include the use of monoclonal antibodies, lymphocytes and cytokines. Advances in the understanding of the immune system are changing the way the interprofessional healthcare team manages cancer. As immunotherapies move to the forefront of cancer treatment, healthcare professionals will need to understand the immune system; know how cancer circumvents it; and be aware of the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety of current and emerging immunotherapies.

The development of immunotherapies to treat cancer has transformed the way clinicians think about managing their patients with many forms of malignancies. The speed, at which basic science and clinical trial information continues to emerge in this area, creates practice and/or educational gaps for busy clinicians who strive to maintain state-of-the art care for their patients with cancer. This field is one of the most clinically relevant and exciting areas of novel drug development in oncology.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 31, 2017
 
Integrating Current & Novel Treatment Strategies for the Management of CRPC
Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed solid organ malignancy in the United States (US) and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 233,000 new cases diagnosed and 29,490 deaths in 2014. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. CRPC occurs when patients' disease progresses despite castrate levels of testosterone. Patients with all stages of CRPC have many treatment options available to them, from frontline therapy to second-line therapy and beyond with both immunotherapy and chemotherapy as current options. The treatment of mCRPC has dramatically changed over the past decade. Recent availability of emerging therapies for CRPC has given medical directors and physicians different studies on how to demonstrate improved survival with a variety of advanced therapeutic agents. Updated guidelines on optimal sequencing and switching of antiandrogens, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, biomarkers and appropriate patient selection criteria in patients with CRPC have been produced and are being used to better treat the disease. The measurement of PSA level has also recently improved the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Despite recent advances, the prognosis for patients with CRPC with disseminated metastatic spread need improvement, with a significant impact on patients’ quality of life resulting predominantly from skeletal metastases. The updated therapeutic agents hope to continue to improve patient prognosis and quality of life by delaying metastatic spread and the need for highly toxic chemotherapeutic agents.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 31, 2017
 
A Closer Look at the Role of CDK4/6 Inhibitors in Hormone Positive Breast Cancer
There is no single treatment strategy that will work for all patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Instead, treatment selection must be individualized based upon patient- and tumor-specific factors, as well as safety and efficacy profile of available agents, with an emphasis on the combined goals of tumor control, prolonged survival, and maintenance of patient quality of life. Effective and timely treatment of metastatic breast cancer can greatly extend and improve quality of life. Tremendous strides are being made in the treatment of both hormone-positive and hormone-negative disease, as well as for patients with specific tumor subtypes. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, and targeted therapies are some of the options that oncologists have available at their disposal. Depending on multiple factors including age, health and where the disease has metastasized, oncologists can pick the most appropriate option from an assortment of treatments. Fortunately for advanced breast cancer patients, several new agents that inhibit two proteins called cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 are currently undergoing late stage clinical trials. They have shown the ability to vastly improve safety and efficacy outcomes, especially in the area of HR+, HER2-Negative metastatic breast cancer. Healthcare professionals are now able to create a customized therapeutic approach that focuses on patient factors and tumor characteristics, which provides patients with improved outcomes and quality of life.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 31, 2018
 
A Look at the Role of VEGF and EGFR Inhibitors in Colorectal Cancer
Colorectal cancer, when discovered early, is highly treatable. However, when the disease has spread, or metastasized, treatment and management becomes much more difficult. Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 70% for regional metastases and 13% for distant metastases. The prognosis of patients with mCRC has significantly improved in recent years with the introduction of inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways. Treatment selection is based largely on the stage (extent) of the cancer and many patients undergo surgery as a first treatment although it is unlikely to cure the disease. Several targeted agents that show improved efficacy and safety in mCRC are now approved, both alone and in combination.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to January 31, 2018
 
Novel Therapies for Improved Patient Outcomes in Metastatic Melanoma
Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer and while it is the least common amongst skin cancers, it is by far the most deadly. In the early stages of melanoma, prognosis is usually good for patients but when the melanoma becomes unresectable/advanced and spreads to other areas of the body, prognosis is especially poor. The most common sites of such spread are under the skin (subcutaneous tissue) and other soft tissues (including lymph nodes), the lungs, liver, brain, and bone. Fortunately new therapy options have recently been approved for patients with melanoma. For many years, interleukin-2 (IL-2) was the primary therapy available for patients with advanced melanoma but new immunotherapies have become available. These therapies help the immune system sustain an active response in its attack on melanoma cells. Recently oncolytic viral therapy has also become available for melanoma patients with unresectable disease that has recurred after initial surgery. This session will review these emerging treatment options, their associated risks, and how individualized therapy and patient education can improve patient outcomes.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 31, 2018
 
Current Treatment of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
NSCLC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, and despite progress in early detection and treatment, prognosis is poor. Historically, treatment has included a variety of modalities such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. More recently, therapeutic options for NSCLC have evolved to include agents such as pemetrexed, gemcitabine, bevacizumab, erlotinib, docetaxel, and cetuximab. Additionally, new options have become available for patients with metastatic squamous NSCLC. The concept of tailoring therapies based on clinical and molecular markers has transformed the management of NSCLC.

Guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) have recently been updated to incorporate a section on maintenance therapy in the management of advanced NSCLC. Maintenance therapy refers to treatment that prevents a cancer from spreading after it has responded to initial treatments, which has been shown to extend the lives of advanced NSCLC patients.

Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to December 31, 2018
 
Recent Advances in the Treatment & Management of Relapsed Refractory Multiple Myeloma
Multiple myeloma is a systemic malignancy of plasma cells that is highly treatable but rarely curable. Treatment selection is influenced by the age and general health of the patient, prior therapy, and the presence of complications of the disease. Treatment is directed at reducing the tumor cell burden and reversing any complications of disease, such as renal failure, infection, hyper viscosity, or hypercalcemia with appropriate medical management. Fortunately for patients with MM, new options have recently become available. These options include the next-generation proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib, and next-generation immunomodulatory agent pomalidomide; both of which appear to improve patient outcomes at a significant rate.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 31, 2017
 
Personalizing Therapy in Advanced NSCLC
Recent clinical data have demonstrated that NSCLC is a very heterogeneous disease. However, as more comprehensive information has been gathered regarding tumor characterization, treatment modalities for NSCLC have expanded to include agents with more specific targets. The use of histologic subtypes and molecular biomarker assessment in NSCLC has resulted in therapeutic paradigms that can be optimized for individual patients based on unique characteristics of their cancer. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) need to be aware of information regarding tumor-specific diagnosis, expanding treatment options, and supporting data to maximize the care of their patients. Additionally, more agents are currently undergoing clinical trials and could help increase prognosis and quality of life in NSCLC patients. With so many effective treatment options becoming available, it is critical to inform medical directors, oncologists and nurses about these agents, and strategies to effectively manage NSCLC patients.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 31, 2017
 
Evolving Strategies in the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma
In the early stages of melanoma, prognosis is usually good for patients, but when the melanoma becomes metastatic and spreads to other areas of the body, prognosis is especially poor. Fortunately for patients with metastatic melanoma, and the physicians that treat them, significant progress has been made in the treatment of this deadly disease over the past few years, both in the areas of targeted therapies and immunotherapies.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 31, 2017
 
Integrating Emerging Therapies into the Treatment Paradigm in the Management of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow and is the most common type of leukemia in adults. It affects B cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In 2016, it is expected that there will be 14,620 new cases of CLL and about 4,650 deaths. Patients with CLL are often diagnosed when they are asymptomatic; therefore, knowing when to initiate treatment may pose a challenge to clinicians. Furthermore, patients with CLL have impaired immune systems and multiple comorbidities, which can complicate management and impact treatment decisions. Fortunately for patients with CLL, several new treatments have recently become available, and others currently undergoing late stage clinical trials and regulatory review, giving clinicians many new options to improve patient outcomes with these new treatments and strategies. This activity focuses on these evolving options, outlines how to incorporate quality measures for the diagnosis and management of CLL, and describes how to apply evidence-based data to select appropriate treatment regimens and manage toxicities.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 31, 2017
 
Novel Agents in the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer
Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed solid organ malignancy in the United States (US) and remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, with an estimated 233,000 new cases diagnosed and 29,490 deaths in 2014. Prostate cancer deaths are typically the result of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and most patients will eventually experience disease progression despite castration, with a median duration of response of 12–24 months. CRPC occurs when patients' disease progresses despite castrate levels of testosterone. Patients with all stages of CRPC have many treatment options available to them, from frontline therapy to second-line therapy and beyond with both immunotherapy and chemotherapy as current options. The treatment of mCRPC has dramatically changed over the past decade. Recent availability of emerging therapies for CRPC has given medical directors and physicians different studies on how to demonstrate improved survival with a variety of advanced therapeutic agents. Updated guidelines on optimal sequencing and switching of antiandrogens, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, biomarkers and appropriate patient selection criteria in patients with CRPC have been produced and are being used to better treat the disease. The measurement of PSA level has also recently improved the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Despite recent advances, the prognosis for patients with CRPC with disseminated metastatic spread need improvement, with a significant impact on patients’ quality of life resulting predominantly from skeletal metastases. The updated therapeutic agents hope to continue to improve patient prognosis and quality of life by delaying metastatic spread and the need for highly toxic chemotherapeutic agents.
Physician, Nursing and CMCN credits valid to July 31, 2017